What is Open Content?

The movement toward open content reflects a growing shift in the way scholars in many parts of the world are conceptualizing education to a view that is more about the process of learning than the information conveyed. Information is everywhere; the challenge is to make effective use of it. Open content uses open licensing schemes, like those of Creative Commons, to encourage not only the sharing of information, but the sharing of pedagogies and experiences as well. Part of the appeal of open content is that it is a response to both the rising costs of traditionally published resources and the lack of educational resources in some regions. As this open, customizable content — and insights about how to teach and learn with it — is increasingly made available for free over the Internet, people are learning not only the material, but also the skills related to finding, evaluating, interpreting, and repurposing the resources. Recent data from Edcetera indicate that open educational resources make up three quarters of the content in most MOOCs; paid content, such as required textbooks, is less than 10%. These data reflect a notable transformation in the culture surrounding open content that will continue to impact how we think about content production, sharing, and learning.

INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).

Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: - Larry Larry Feb 8, 2012

(1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?

  • Surprised there is not more comment here. Flipped classroom, blended learning, online learning rely on the lecturer being able to bring together digital resources/content and scaffold for the learner. Having ready access open content that is easily searched is vital - geoff.romeo geoff.romeo Feb 23, 2014
  • add your response here

(2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?

  • Did I not see somewhere that an enterprising publisher now offers a service to bring together commercial and open content for the person designing the blended learning environment. Is this the future? Could consortium of universities begin this sort of enterprise and share development work and take advantage of economies of scale? - geoff.romeo geoff.romeo Feb 23, 2014
  • add your response here

(3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry?

  • add your response here
  • add your response here

(4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?

Please share information about related projects in our Horizon Project sharing form.